We've been practicing forest management for more than a century in Washington State.
Wood from Washington's working forests is a renewable, sustainable natural resource.

Rural communities rise up for active forest management

As state, local and federal leaders continue to take stock after this year's horrendous wildfire season, the calls for more active management of our state and federal forests are getting louder and louder.

The Ellensburg (Wash.) Daily Record recently published testimony in front of a U.S. Senate committee from Kittitas County Commissioner Gary Berndt. The commissioner spoke about the fires that regularly plague his community and how the only long-term answer is healthier, less crowded forests.

...The solution for the long term will also have to involve strategic timber harvest and stand thinning. Recently the Nature Conservancy purchased nearly 50,000 acres of timberland in our county and they acknowledge that forest management will be critical to achieving their goals including reducing the threat from fire.

Incident management teams are much more successful and cost effective when there are options to guide fire into managed areas with access and reduced fuels.

I believe that there is a once in a lifetime opportunity to create solutions which will help prevent and drastically lessen the impact and numbers of fires we are enduring. A first step must be to establish a funding mechanism that does not “raid” funds for management activities to pay for suppression costs. Sen. Cantwell has discussed this and without the funds to carry on routine management activities, nothing will change.

I see communities across the West continue to be at peril from catastrophic fire impacts. I have managed fires where families have lost everything; I have worked my entire career to minimize the damage to forests watersheds and local economies. The solution is to better improve immediate response and management, but the real solution is to develop a plan of action that will create a fire resistant healthy forest environment.


Counties and schools receive the Forest Harvest Excise Tax (FET) and property tax

Public and private timber harvesters pay the FET in addition to the property tax on timberland.

Private landowners help fund wildfire costs

Private landowners share the burden of preparing for and fighting wildfire.

Wood is our Most Natural Resource

Wood from sustainably managed forests provides the best low-energy building material.

Forest Products Industry Jobs Impact

Nearly 40,000 direct jobs are provided by the forest products industry.

Forest Products Industry Economic Impact

Washington is the 2nd largest lumber producer in the nation, paying wages, taxes and providing environmental benefits for Washington State.

Forest Landowner RMAP Accomplishments

From 2001 through June 2013, landowners have removed an impressive 5,641 barriers to fish passage, restoring 3,893 miles of historic fish habitat.

Dr. David Montgomery - UW Geomorphology Professor and GEER team scientist

Anatomy of a Landslide: Published on Sep 22, 2014 GEER—Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance—is a team of volunteer scientists who visit natural disasters to determine causes and help prepare for or prevent future disasters.

GEER Report One of the largest causes of the slide was extreme rainfall.

Landslide Mobility Hazards: Implications of the 2014 Oso Disaster Near record rainfall gave Oso its destructive force.

WSDOT Geotechnical Study on SR 530 and Geotechnical Soil Characterization of Intact Quaternary Deposits Forming the March 22, 2014 (Oso) Landslide Drilling information in the reports show a more complex stratigraphy than was assumed prior to the slide, showing that surface activity, such as forestry, likely had nothing to do with the deep-seated landslide.